Wholefood Cooking

THE​ ​MIGHTY​ ​​ ​GOOD​ ​AND​ ​NOURISHING​ ​OAT​ ​BISCUIT​ & BAR ​FOR​ ​ADULTS​ ​AND​ ​CHILDREN​

Photography ©Harriet Harcourt
Photgraphy ©Harriet Harcourt

When​ ​I​ ​was​ ​recently​ ​asked​ ​by​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​to​ ​develop​ ​a​ ​recipe,​ ​I​ ​jumped​ ​at​ ​the​ ​opportunity​ ​to use​ ​their​ ​chocolate​ ​as​ ​my​ ​primary​ ​ingredient​ ​(you​ ​can​ ​read​ ​more​ ​about​ ​why​ ​below).​ ​But​ ​what​ ​to make​ ​?!!!​ ​So​ ​I​ ​went​ ​to​ ​you, my ​ ​readers​ ​on​ ​Instagram​ ​and​ ​Facebook​ ​and​ ​overwhelmingly​ ​the​ ​request was​ ​for​ ​a​ ​SIMPLE,​ ​EASY​ ​AND​ ​QUICK​ ​TO​ ​MAKE,​ ​NOURISHING,​ ​MIGHTY​ ​GOOD,​ ​CHOC DROP​ ​SOMETHING​ ​for​ ​school​ ​lunches,​ ​afternoon​ ​tea​ ​and​ ​something​ ​an​ ​adult​ ​might​ ​love​ ​as well, please Jude !!!!​ ​I’m​ ​thrilled​ ​with​ ​the​ ​end​ ​result.​ ​Whilst​ ​the​ ​adult​ ​and​ ​child​ ​version​ ​are​ ​slightly​ ​different, they​ ​have​ ​enough​ ​common​ ​DNA​ ​allowing​ ​for​ ​them​ ​to​ ​made​ ​together,​ ​and​ ​it’s​ ​super​ ​easy​ ​and quick​ ​to​ ​do.​ ​Both​ ​last​ ​brilliantly​ ​in​ ​an​ ​airtight​ ​container​ ​for​ ​up​ ​to​ ​-​ ​well,​ ​I​ ​was​ ​still​ ​eating samples​ ​after​ ​2​ ​weeks​ ​(but​ ​obviously​ ​they​ ​are​ ​at​ ​their​ ​best​ ​within​ ​7​ ​days).

 

What’s so good about Organic Times cacao/cocoa / chocolate?
Chocolate,​ ​as​ ​we​ ​know​ ​it,​ ​is​ ​the​ ​result​ ​of​ ​a​ ​long​ ​process.​ ​Seeds​ ​from​ ​the​ ​cacao​ ​tree​ ​are​ ​firstly scooped​ ​out​ ​of​ ​the​ ​large​ ​pods​ ​and​ ​left​ ​to​ ​ferment​ ​and​ ​then​ ​spread​ ​out​ ​to​ ​dry.​ ​At​ ​this​ ​stage,​ ​the beans​ ​are​ ​considered​ ​to​ ​be​ ​raw​ ​—​ ​the​ ​full​ ​flavour​ ​that​ ​is​ ​chocolate,​ ​is​ ​yet​ ​to​ ​be​ ​realised.​ ​The seeds​ ​are​ ​then​ ​roasted​ ​and​ ​shelled​ ​to​ ​become​ ​what​ ​we​ ​call​ ​nibs,​ ​which​ ​can​ ​be​ ​left​ ​whole​ ​or broken​ ​into​ ​pieces.​ ​During​ ​roasting​ ​the​ ​flavour​ ​of​ ​cocoa​ ​is​ ​developed.​ ​Within​ ​the​ ​Raw​ ​Food movement,​ ​a​ ​view​ ​is​ ​held​ ​that​ ​raw​ ​cocoa/​ ​cacao​ ​ (​both​ ​names​ ​are​ ​correct,​ ​and​ ​either​ ​can​ ​be​ ​used​) nibs​ ​and​ ​(and​ ​thus​ ​all​ ​chocolate​ ​products​ ​that​ ​come​ ​from​ ​them)​ ​are​ ​more​ ​nutritious​ ​and preferable but​ ​this​ ​is​ ​highly​ ​contentious​ ​and​ ​not at all ​necessarily​ ​true,​ ​as​ ​that​ ​desirable​ ​mineral​ ​and nutrient​ ​bounty​ ​is​ ​only​ ​made​ ​bio​ ​available​ ​during​ ​the​ ​fermentation​ ​process. ​Whilst​ ​the​ ​raw product​ ​does​ ​have​ ​higher​ ​levels​ ​of​ ​phytonutrients​ ​they​ ​also​ ​have​ ​higher​ ​levels​ ​of​ ​antinutrients such​ ​as​ ​phytic​ ​acid​ ​(and​ ​indeed​ ​are​ ​along​ ​with​ ​coffee,​ ​one​ ​of​ ​the​ ​high​ ​phytic​ ​acid​ ​seeds)​ ​which makes​ ​very​ ​little​ ​bio​ ​available.​ ​​ ​Fermentation​ ​plays​ ​a​ ​primary​ ​role​ ​in​ ​breaking​ ​these​ ​anti nutrients​ ​down,​ ​where​ ​high​ ​temperatures​ ​are​ ​reached​ ​during​ ​this​ ​process and this is the traditional wisdom of cacao.
The​ ​nibs​ ​are​ ​then​ ​ground​ ​to​ ​form​ ​a​ ​thick​ ​paste​ ​—​ ​this​ ​is​ ​known​ ​as​ ​​cocoa​ ​liquor​,​ ​​ ​made​ ​up​ ​of​ ​fat (which​ ​we​ ​call​ ​cocoa​ ​butter)​ ​and​ ​cocoa​ ​solids​ ​(which​ ​we​ ​call​ ​cocoa​ ​|​ ​cacao​ ​powder)​ ​—​ ​do you remember the movie Chocolat (yes with the gorgeous Johnny Depp) – where she would grind the nibs into the liquor on the old stone ? – and​ ​in some​ ​cases​ ​vanilla​ ​and​ ​sugar​ ​is​ ​also​ ​added​ ​at​ ​this​ ​stage.​ ​The​ ​cocoa​ ​liquor​ ​can ​then​ ​pressed​ ​to remove​ ​most​ ​of​ ​the​ ​fat​ ​(cocoa​ ​butter),​ ​and​ ​the​ ​remaining​ ​solids​ ​are​ ​ground​ ​to​ ​what​ ​we​ ​know​ ​as cocoa​ ​|cacao​ ​powder.​ ​Cocoa​ ​is​ ​a​ ​lot​ ​like​ ​coffee,​ ​quite​ ​acidic​ ​—​ ​this​ ​varies​ ​with​ ​the​ ​variety​ ​of bean,​ ​and​ ​is​ ​also​ ​increased​ ​when​ ​the​ ​fat​ ​is​ ​removed.​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​chocolate​ ​products​ ​are grown​ ​and​ ​processed​ ​to​ ​the​ ​highest​ ​traditional​ ​standards,​ ​and​ ​because​ ​they​ ​are​ ​not​ ​raw​ ​you​ ​are assured​ ​of​ ​a​ ​delicious,​ ​health​ ​supportive​ ​​ ​and​ ​​ ​nourishing​ ​end​ ​result.

 

Natural​ ​cocoa​ ​powder​ ​and​ ​dutched​ ​cocoa​ ​powder
Most​ ​natural​ ​cocoa​ ​powders​ ​are​ ​tart​ ​and​ ​acidic, especially if they are not of high quality. ​One​ ​of​ ​the​ ​methods​ ​devised​ ​to​ ​reduce​ ​this problem​ ​was​ ​that​ ​of​ ​alkalising​ ​the​ ​cocoa​ ​powder​ ​by​ ​soaking​ ​the​ ​nibs​ ​in​ ​an​ ​alkaline solution,​ ​commonly​ ​potassium​ ​carbonate,​ ​which​ ​neutralises​ ​the​ ​acid​ ​and​ ​softens​ ​the​ ​flavour (by a Dutchman, hence the term Dutching or Dutched cacao/cocoa). This​ ​process​ ​also​ ​changes​ ​the​ ​colour​ ​of​ ​the​ ​cocoa​ ​to​ ​a​ ​deep​ ​chocolatey​ ​red.​ ​I​ ​do​ ​love​ ​using Dutched​ ​cocoa​ ​powder,​ ​with​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​as​ ​my​ ​first​ ​choice.​ ​In​ ​baking,​ ​you​ ​must​ ​know​ ​which type​ ​of​ ​cocoa​ ​powder​ ​you​ ​are​ ​dealing​ ​with,​ ​as​ ​the​ ​acidity​ ​of​ ​a​ ​natural​ ​or​ ​undutched​ ​cocoa​ ​will interact​ ​with​ ​whatever​ ​leavening​ ​you​ ​are​ ​using.

 

Organic​ ​Times​ ​Dark​ ​Choc​ ​Drops
Dark​ ​chocolate​ ​set​ ​in​ ​bars​ ​or​ ​as​ ​drops,​ ​is​ ​a​ ​mixture​ ​of​ ​varying​ ​%​ ​of​ ​cocoa​ ​liquor,​ ​sweetening, flavouring​ ​(such​ ​as​ ​vanilla),​ ​and​ ​an​ ​emulsifier,​ ​commonly​ ​soya​ ​lecithin.​ ​The​ ​proportions determine​ ​the​ ​mouthfeel,​ ​flavour​ ​and​ ​use​ ​of​ ​the​ ​end​ ​result​ ​.​ ​Most​ ​organic​ ​brands​ ​use​ ​raw​ ​sugar, but​ ​​Organic​ ​Time​s​ ​uses​ ​rapadura​ ​sugar,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​makes​ ​for​ ​a​ ​beautifully​ ​wholesome,​ ​​ ​sweetened chocolate.

 

If you would like to read further about the lowdown of the Organic Times Cacao | Cocoa | Chocolate go HERE, it’s well worth the read.

I’d love to hear how you go, and how you like them… I do hope you enjoy both recipes…. x Jude 

 

Recipes ©Jude Blereau and Organic Times 2017

MIGHTY CHOC DROP AND BANANA BAR OR BISCUIT/COOKIE

Ingredients

THE DRY MIX
1​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​100g​ ​​ ​rolled​ ​oats
1​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​130g​ ​white​ ​spelt
1⁄2​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​50g​ ​desiccated​ ​coconut
1⁄2​ ​teaspoon​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​baking​ ​powder
1⁄2​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​90g​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​Dark​ ​Choc​ ​Drops
THE​ ​WET​ ​MIX
150​ ​g​ ​Organic Times unsalted​ ​butter
1⁄4​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​45g​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​rapadura​ ​sugar
1⁄4​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​80g​ ​brown​ ​rice​ ​syrup
2​ ​medium​ ​ripe​ ​banana​ ​|​ ​180​ ​g​ ​without​ ​peel,​ ​roughly​ ​mashed
1​ ​teaspoon​ ​natural​ ​vanilla​ ​extract

Spelt | Oat | Egg Free | Dairy Free Option

These​ ​are​ ​just​ ​delicious​ ​and​ ​so​ ​easy​ ​to​ ​make,​ ​grab​ ​one​ ​of​ ​these​ ​for​ ​exceptional​ ​slow​ ​release​ ​nourishment. My​ ​preference​ ​is​ ​for​ ​the​ ​biscuit,​ ​where​ ​they​ ​become​ ​deliciously​ ​caramelised​ ​along​ ​the​ ​edges​ ​and​ ​just​ ​a bit​ ​chewy.​ ​In​ ​summer,​ ​ensure​ ​you​ ​store​ ​these​ ​in​ ​a​ ​cool,​ ​and​ ​dark​ ​place​ ​as​ ​they​ ​could​ ​otherwise​ ​become​ ​a bit​ ​mouldy​ ​thanks​ ​to​ ​the​ ​fruit​ ​they​ ​contain.

BAKING​ ​NOTES

  • It’s​ ​critical​ ​that​ ​the​ ​rolled​ ​oats,​ ​and​ ​wet​ ​mix​ ​are​ ​both​ ​cool,​ ​otherwise​ ​the​ ​choc​ ​drops​ ​will​ ​melt.
  • I​ ​used​ ​a​ ​generic​ ​rolled​ ​oats​ ​that​ ​are​ ​readily​ ​available​ ​throughout​ ​Australia​ ​-​ ​the​ ​Macro​ ​brand from​ ​Woolworths in Australia
  • It​ ​is​ ​worth​ ​noting​ ​that​ ​I​ ​used​ ​a​ ​high​ ​quality​ ​brown​ ​rice​ ​syrup​ ​such​ ​as​ ​Spiral.  ​Using​ ​a​ ​cheaper, inferior​ ​(more​ ​lightly​ ​coloured)​ ​will​ ​increase​ ​the​ ​sugars,​ ​and​ ​affect​ ​how​ ​it​ ​bakes.
  • This​ ​recipe​ ​uses​ ​butter,​ ​and​ ​gives​ ​it​ ​a​ ​superior​ ​flavour​ ​and​ ​texture.​ ​You​ ​can​ ​replace​ ​the​ ​butter with​ ​coconut​ ​oil,​ ​but​ ​please​ ​note​ ​-​ ​whilst​ ​they​ ​will​ ​be​ ​lovely​ ​when​ ​warm,​ ​the​ ​texture​ ​will​ ​become denser​ ​as​ ​they​ ​cool.
  • I​ ​baked​ ​in​ ​a​ ​fan​ ​forced​ ​oven
  • You​ ​can​ ​make​ ​this​ ​as​ ​biscuits​ ​(as​ ​per​ ​the​ ​pictures),​ ​or​ ​as​ ​a​ ​bar.​ ​When​ ​making​ ​as​ ​a​ ​biscuit​ ​I​ ​prefer to​ ​bake​ ​these​ ​on​ ​a​ ​lightly​ ​butter​ ​greased​ ​baking​ ​tray​ ​rather​ ​than​ ​lining​ ​the​ ​tray​ ​with​ ​baking paper.​ ​If​ ​making​ ​as​ ​a​ ​bar,​ ​line​ ​the​ ​base​ ​of​ ​a​ ​20cm​ ​square​ ​baking​ ​tin​ ​with​ ​baking​ ​paper,​ ​and lightly​ ​grease​ ​the​ ​sides.
  • Don’t​ ​bake​ ​the​ ​bar​ ​in​ ​silicone​ ​-​ ​you​ ​need​ ​the​ ​metal​ ​sides​ ​to​ ​add​ ​the​ ​type​ ​of​ ​heat​ ​needed​ ​for​ ​a good​ ​bar.

Directions

Pre heat oven to 180c or 150c if fan forced. Place​ ​the​ ​oats​ ​on​ ​a​ ​baking​ ​tray,​ ​spread​ ​evenly​ ​and​ ​bake​ ​until​ ​lightly​ ​toasted​ ​-​ ​about​ ​5​ ​-​ ​8​ ​minutes.​ ​Set aside​ ​to​ ​cool.

Place​ ​the​ ​butter,​ ​sugar​ ​and​ ​​ ​brown​ ​rice​ ​syrup​ ​in​ ​a​ ​small​ ​pot​ ​over​ ​a​ ​gentle​ ​heat.​ ​As​ ​the​ ​butter​ ​begins​ ​to melt,​ ​stir​ ​the​ ​mix​ ​through,​ ​and​ ​leave​ ​until​ ​the​ ​butter​ ​is​ ​fully​ ​melted​ ​and​ ​the​ ​mix​ ​is​ ​ever​ ​so​ ​gently bubbling.​ ​Stir​ ​through​ ​and​ ​set​ ​aside​ ​to​ ​cool.

While​ ​these​ ​are​ ​happening,​ ​prepare​ ​your​ ​trays​ ​(you​ ​will​ ​likely​ ​need​ ​2​ ​for​ ​biscuits),​ ​or​ ​tin​ ​as​ ​discussed​ ​in the​ ​baking​ ​notes.

When​ ​the​ ​oats​ ​and​ ​liquid​ ​mix​ ​is​ ​cool:
Add​ ​the​ ​dry​ ​ingredients,​ ​including​ ​the​ ​cooled​ ​oats​ ​to​ ​a​ ​bowl.​ ​Whisk​ ​through​ ​to​ ​evenly​ ​distribute​ ​the ingredients.
Mash​ ​the​ ​banana​ ​and​ ​add​ ​to​ ​the​ ​cooled​ ​butter​ ​mix,​ ​along​ ​with​ ​the​ ​vanilla​ ​and​ ​stir​ ​through.​ ​Add​ ​this​ ​mix to​ ​the​ ​dry​ ​ingredients,​ ​mixing​ ​well.

Photography ©Harriet Harcourt
Photography ©Harriet Harcourt

If making as a biscuit:
Spoon​ ​about​ ​1​ ​tablespoon​ ​of​ ​mixture​ ​onto​ ​the​ ​greased​ ​baking​ ​tray​ ​and​ ​don’t​ ​flatten.​ ​Bake​ ​for​ ​30​ ​minutes or​ ​until​ ​golden.​ ​I​ ​find​ ​these​ ​have​ ​2​ ​obvious​ ​stages​ ​-​ ​the​ ​first​ ​where​ ​the​ ​edges​ ​are​ ​golden,​ ​but​ ​the​ ​centre​ ​is not​ ​quite.​ ​It’s​ ​tempting​ ​to​ ​think​ ​they​ ​are​ ​ready​ ​at​ ​this​ ​stage…​ ​keep​ ​going,​ ​until​ ​the​ ​entire​ ​biscuit​ ​is golden,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​is​ ​likely​ ​the​ ​edges​ ​will​ ​be​ ​quite​ ​dark.​ ​This​ ​is​ ​when​ ​they​ ​are​ ​done,​ ​and​ ​deliciously caramelised.​ ​Remove​ ​from​ ​the​ ​oven​ ​and​ ​leave​ ​to​ ​cool​ ​for​ ​10​ ​minutes​ ​before​ ​removing​ ​them​ ​to​ ​a​ ​wire rack​ ​to​ ​cool.​ ​Don’t​ ​let​ ​them​ ​cool​ ​down​ ​completely​ ​on​ ​the​ ​baking​ ​tray,​ ​as​ ​they​ ​could​ ​well​ ​stick.
If making as a bar:
Place​ ​the​ ​mix​ ​in​ ​the​ ​baking​ ​tin​ ​and​ ​spread​ ​out​ ​evenly​ ​pressing​ ​down​ ​a​ ​little​ ​to​ ​make​ ​a​ ​smooth,​ ​even​ ​top. Cook​ ​for​ ​30​ ​-​ ​35​ ​minutes​ ​-​ ​or​ ​until​ ​it​ ​is​ ​beginning​ ​to​ ​look​ ​evenly​ ​golden.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​very​ ​likely​ ​that​ ​the​ ​outside edges​ ​may​ ​look​ ​overdone,​ ​they​ ​will​ ​be​ ​fine.​ ​Allow​ ​to​ ​cool​ ​a​ ​little​ ​before​ ​gently​ ​running​ ​a​ ​butter​ ​knife​ ​to loosen​ ​the​ ​edges​ ​-​ ​then​ ​leave​ ​to​ ​cool​ ​fully​ ​before​ ​inverting​ ​the​ ​bake​ ​onto​ ​a​ ​board​ ​for​ ​cutting.

,

A​ ​DELICIOUS​ ​ADULT​ ​VERSION​ ​-​ ​SALTED​ ​SESAME,​ ​DARK​ ​CHOCOLATE,​ ​TAHINI​ ​AND​ ​DATE

Ingredients

THE​ ​DRY​ ​MIX
2​ ​cups​ ​|​ ​200​ ​g​ ​rolled​ ​oats
1⁄4​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​35​ ​g​ ​toasted​ ​sesame​ ​seeds
1⁄4​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​30​ ​g​ ​toasted,​ ​skin​ ​removed,​ ​​ ​finely​ ​ground​ ​hazelnuts
generous​ ​pinch​ ​sea​ ​salt
1⁄2​ ​teaspoon​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​Baking​ ​Powder
1⁄2​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​105g​ ​pitted​ ​fresh​ ​dates​ ​(this​ ​will​ ​be​ ​about​ ​8)​ ​cut​ ​into​ ​small​ ​pieces
THE​ ​WET​ ​MIX
150​ ​g​ ​Organic Times unsalted​ ​butter
1⁄4​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​45g​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​rapadura​ ​sugar
1⁄4​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​80g​ ​brown​ ​rice​ ​syrup
1⁄2​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​110g​ ​hulled​ ​tahini
1​ ​teaspoon​ ​natural​ ​vanilla​ ​extract
THE​ ​SALTED​ ​CHOCOLATE​ ​AND​ ​TAHINI​ ​TOPPING
1⁄2​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​90​ ​g​ ​Organic​ ​Times​ ​Dark​ ​Choc​ ​Drops
1⁄4​ ​cup​ ​|​ ​55g​ ​hulled​ ​tahini
Generous​ ​pinch​ ​sea​ ​salt

Oat | Egg Free | Low Gluten

These​ ​are​ ​some​ ​of​ ​favourite​ ​flavour​ ​combinations,​ ​and​ ​this​ ​is​ ​a​ ​delicious,​ ​nutrient​ ​dense​ ​bar.​ ​As​ ​adults, we​ ​can​ ​happily​ ​have​ ​a​ ​lovely​ ​topping​ ​of​ ​chocolate,​ ​knowing​ ​it​ ​won’t​ ​melt​ ​in​ ​our​ ​lunchboxes​ ​!​ ​I​ ​have​ ​found this​ ​bar​ ​to​ ​still​ ​be​ ​just​ ​fine​ ​2​ ​weeks​ ​after​ ​making.

 

BAKING​ ​NOTES:
Make​ ​sure​ ​that​ ​you​ ​give​ ​the​ ​tahini​ ​a​ ​really​ ​good​ ​stir​ ​so​ ​the​ ​oil​ ​is​ ​fully​ ​incorporated​ ​before​ ​using​ ​it.​ ​I​ ​find the​ ​handle​ ​of​ ​a​ ​wooden​ ​spoon​ ​great​ ​for​ ​this​ ​job.

Directions

Pre​ ​heat​ ​oven​ ​to​ ​170c,​ ​or​ ​140c​ ​if​ ​fan​ ​forced​ ​***please​ ​note​ ​this​ ​cooks​ ​at​ ​a​ ​lower​ ​temperature​ ​than​ ​the Mighty​ ​Choc​ ​Drop​ ​and​ ​Banana​ ​mix.
Line​ ​the​ ​base​ ​of​ ​a​ ​20cm​ ​square​ ​baking​ ​tin​ ​with​ ​baking​ ​paper,​ ​and​ ​lightly​ ​grease​ ​the​ ​sides.

Place​ ​the​ ​oats​ ​on​ ​a​ ​baking​ ​tray,​ ​spread​ ​evenly​ ​and​ ​bake​ ​until​ ​lightly​ ​toasted​ ​-​ ​about​ ​5​ ​-​ ​8​ ​minutes.​ ​Set aside​ ​to​ ​cool.
Place​ ​the​ ​butter,​ ​sugar​ ​and​ ​​ ​brown​ ​rice​ ​syrup​ ​in​ ​a​ ​small​ ​pot​ ​over​ ​a​ ​gentle​ ​heat.​ ​As​ ​the​ ​butter​ ​begins​ ​to melt,​ ​stir​ ​the​ ​mix​ ​through,​ ​and​ ​leave​ ​until​ ​the​ ​butter​ ​is​ ​fully​ ​melted​ ​and​ ​the​ ​mix​ ​is​ ​ever​ ​so​ ​gently bubbling.​ ​Stir​ ​through,​ ​add​ ​the​ ​tahini​ ​and​ ​vanilla,​ ​and​ ​set​ ​aside​ ​to​ ​cool​ ​a​ ​little.

Add​ ​the​ ​dry​ ​ingredients,​ ​including​ ​the​ ​cooled​ ​oats​ ​to​ ​a​ ​bowl.​ ​Whisk​ ​through​ ​to​ ​evenly​ ​distribute​ ​the ingredients,​ ​especially​ ​ensuring​ ​that​ ​the​ ​dates​ ​are​ ​not​ ​stuck​ ​together.

Add​ ​the​ ​wet​ ​​ ​mix​ ​to​ ​the​ ​dry​ ​ingredients,​ ​mixing​ ​well.
Place​ ​the​ ​mix​ ​in​ ​the​ ​baking​ ​tin​ ​and​ ​spread​ ​out​ ​evenly​ ​pressing​ ​down​ ​a​ ​little​ ​to​ ​make​ ​a​ ​smooth,​ ​even​ ​top. Cook​ ​for​ ​30​ ​​ ​minutes​ ​-​ ​or​ ​until​ ​it​ ​is​ ​evenly​ ​golden.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​very​ ​likely​ ​that​ ​the​ ​outside​ ​edges​ ​may​ ​look overdone,​ ​indeed​ ​this​ ​is​ ​how​ ​it​ ​should​ ​look​ ​and​ ​they​ ​will​ ​be​ ​fine.​ ​Allow​ ​to​ ​cool​ ​a​ ​little​ ​before​ ​gently running​ ​a​ ​butter​ ​knife​ ​to​ ​loosen​ ​the​ ​edges​ ​-​ ​then​ ​leave​ ​to​ ​cool​ ​fully​ ​before​ ​inverting​ ​the​ ​bake​ ​onto​ ​a board​ ​for​ ​cutting.

Don’t​ ​start​ ​to​ ​make​ ​the​ ​topping​ ​until​ ​the​ ​bar​ ​is​ ​absolutely​ ​cool.​ ​​To​ ​make​ ​the​ ​topping,​ ​​add​ ​the​ ​choc​ ​drops and​ ​tahini​ ​to​ ​a​ ​small​ ​pot​ ​and​ ​place​ ​over​ ​a​ ​​very​ ​gentle​ ​heat.​​ ​You​ ​do​ ​not​ ​need​ ​a​ ​lot​ ​of​ ​heat​ ​to​ ​melt​ ​the​ ​choc drops.​ ​Ensure​ ​also​ ​that​ ​no​ ​water​ ​(at​ ​all,​ ​no​ ​drops)​ ​touch​ ​the​ ​chocolate​ ​or​ ​else​ ​it​ ​will​ ​seize.​ ​When​ ​the chocolate​ ​is​ ​beginning​ ​to​ ​look​ ​soft,​ ​mix​ ​it​ ​through​ ​the​ ​tahini​ ​until​ ​it​ ​is​ ​one.​ ​Add​ ​a​ ​generous​ ​pinch​ ​of​ ​salt, leave​ ​to​ ​cool​ ​just​ ​a​ ​little​ ​before​ ​frosting​ ​the​ ​bar,​ ​leave​ ​to​ ​cool​ ​completely​ ​before​ ​cutting.

Photography ©Harriet Harcourt

2 responses to “THE​ ​MIGHTY​ ​​ ​GOOD​ ​AND​ ​NOURISHING​ ​OAT​ ​BISCUIT​ & BAR ​FOR​ ​ADULTS​ ​AND​ ​CHILDREN​”

  1. Jude, mine is just falling apart? I did use peacsns instead and a spoonful of spreadable butter as I’d runout. I cooked for 35 mins fan forced at 140c. It was bubbles ng while cooking? Just has not really bonded?

    Any thoughts.
    Thank you
    Sarah

  2. Hi Sarah,
    I’m not sure when you submitted this, but huge apologies to you. Been a bit few on. Okay. I’m thinking that you have made the Tahini, hazlenut one… and replaced it with pecans. I think the issue will be with the oats. Some oats are quite dry and very toasted already when you buy them… also the spreadable butter. Is this a butter made spreadable with oil, or water ? Both would contribute. Also, it’s got to be well cooked. Have you tried it again? What has happened… I have made this heaps of time and it’s fine. x Jude

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